Tag Archives: coyote

CRACK OF DAWN

Wynona

Four rows for a reason

By quarter-to-six the decoys looked perfect in the field out front of the blind, a coyote had drifted across the field like a sneaky shadow, and the cadence from the inmates at Willard was on the breeze. From 7 miles away its population of convicted drug-addicts were out for their red jumpsuit left-right-left rain or shine morning constitutional.

We called to tight-beaked turkeys in the woods.
The eerie echo of felons in cyclone fence was the only response.

Right set-up. Wrong birds.

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OLD MAN RIVER, Installment 4, Thesis

Another from the thesis. I spend a total of two months in the Delta doing research for a book about the Delta Blues. One day I had a chance to paddle on the river in a dugout canoe, hand made by John Ruskey. There’s only a handful of natural wonders in this great country that can grab you by your soul and fill you full of a profound new perspective. The Mississippi is one.

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Yesterday on the river, the Old Man spoke in roiling current & half buried bleach-white branches. Heading upstream, hugging the shoreline to avoid thousand-yard barges & the Coast Guard tug snagging stranded buoys, we paddled past lifetimes of conversation gouged out of the rip-rapped banks, past forty, fifty foot trees beached thirty foot above water-line, like broken toothpicks discarded after a dinner of catfish, fried okra, black-eyed peas & sweet tea.

When you’re on the Mississippi you’re on river time.
I kept waiting for something to happen.

We made a fire among driftwood on a sandbar & boiled water for coffee while the river slipped past silent as the smoke from the black walnut we were burning. I crossed the tracks of beaver that had gnawed down brush-branches & dragged them to the water, a raccoon’s small hand-prints following the waterline for dead fish, the ghosts of coyotes wrestling around higher up the bank—tails swishing sand, paws, bellies, backs & snouts imprinted. The river is down 18 foot from normal for this time of year & we’re all taking advantage.

When spring sends its run-off from the Continental Divide & Ohio River valley, from Canada & the northern plains, our tracks here will be washed away—disappearing in that immense breath.

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Filed under In the woods, On the water, Poetry, The road